— Temporal Vortex

The Predicament of Music as an Art

NC647

The importance to us of "music" as it fade.

First, I’d like to say that the scope of the entry doesn’t necessarily describe the general setting because it may vary for every country, depending on how they value their music, culture, and most significantly, their musicians.

Music is very rich and diverse when you relate it to culture and to the society itself. Some were given the talent and chance to heighten them, and now they are the ones we watch and listen to as they play. We are indeed entertained whenever we listen or watch their superb performances, but do we really treat them as though they are significant as much as we listen to their “music” ? By what I mean “music”, I’d like to you to refer it to as the classical ones. The musicians I cover here also only refers to the conservatory students who really took the path of music through formal education and not the contemporary musicians such as pop singers and such.

NC06

It can't be helped? Why!?

Almost everyone knows Nodame Cantabile falls in the genre of music, which is why I picked it to show why music is currently facing a predicament. Also, I presume all of those who watched it knows that Chiaki has a phobia in riding airplanes which he overcame. Well, I’m glad he overcame this phobia of his. Nevertheless, the thing I want to know is why other people fuss about this idea of “Musicians should study/go in/to Europe”. The reason why Chiaki befall into despair during his stay in Japan before meeting Nodame.

NC04

Why? Is it THAT BAD to stay in Japan?

Europe, well, is basically the land where classical music was born. And then? Witnessing the culture of the origin of the music itself might be a help in widening your horizons and perception in viewing classical music, other than that, you’d receive the training from the real maestros of classical music themselves. Yes, it’s a leverage when you come back to your country but just as many people are saying, Europe is the central of the classical music. So why go back? Exactly. The chances these musicians in Europe would come back to their homelands is rather small. Basically, because European countries really focus their tourism through these opera and orchestra stage performances. Musicians from other countries had already found their jobs here with a good pay because almost all the orchestras are government subsidized. Meaning to say, European countries do care about the fact that classical music originated from them, and they try to reinforce it. What about us? What about our countries? Do they care as much to these musicians who decided to pursue work/studies overseas? How about supporting these musicians so their very own country could keep them as an asset and not by other European countries?

NC05

That's right Mine, but the government just see you guys as export products lined-up for Europe.

The government plays a big role in ensuring that the music industry is thriving, and yes they do but they focus on the mainstream unlike those who pursue the classical path. This is rather sad because you could only feel the support of the government whenever there is an upcoming competition that represents the country. This is why it has been a difficult move to materialize such ideas, like forming an orchestra. The government doesn’t really support the musicians even though the fact is, there are bodies already in the society that is responsible for these things, although they never really do something about it. They are the ones that’s supposedly manages the award giving bodies and concours and yet they take this for granted — They didn’t know that this is the only motivation for the musicians to better improve their musicality.

We also do have our conservatories but then, do we really encourage students to enroll to conservatories? Most of the parents these days often — more like always prefer having their children to have a blue collar job after studying in college. Can we see the problem here? More musicians are getting pirated by other countries in Europe and there are lesser students aspiring to be musicians. There might have parents who liked their kids to learn some piano and violin, but oftentimes, they don’t let the child to pursue it as his/her profession. <<–(cliche already).

NC07

I don’t know. I’m not a musician afterall. I just came to notice it after all this time. Even Nodame Cantabile constitute this idea of studying overseas. Well, I’m not condemning the assertion that it is really better there if you want to be a known and good musician but we must also consider that we should not be that glad about this phenomenon, or probably a practice already of aiming to go to Europe to be a better musician and seek future there because it really places music in a trouble.

Can’t the government give these musicians more options? It’s as if musicians got no choice but to travel to Europe just to be better in music. Why not find means to improve on it on our own? Of course this statement is rather heavy but empty. Then again, nothing is impossible if both the government and the musicians would help — or else Europe would forever monopolize the music industry in classical performances.

And lastly, just like the dialogue here above by Chiaki’s mother, why bother going to Europe about having the real maestros as your instructor when you could already play as great and communicate well your “music” to others? The important is, both of you could appreciate it.

6 comments
  1. mangaNo Gravatar says: August 23, 20099:15 pm

    Well. If you want to make music then Japan is not the country to be in. Most of the time anyway. For videogame and anime related music Japan is still awesome, but when it comes to other type of music I don´t know why but it just isn´t as big as in other countries.

    I do not understand this myself but it´s just the way things are at this point.

    If I had a person I looked up to in another country I would try and get him to teach me to get better. If I had Chiaki´s problems it would probably turn me into someone very sad as there would be so much problems with fullfilling a dream that I have.

    As for the future of music as an art. Given how many of the popular music now is more about showing as much flesh as possible along with repeating small bits of sound over and over again then music is doomed. As an art form that is.

  2. zzeroparticleNo Gravatar says: August 24, 20092:01 am

    Witnessing the culture of the origin of the music itself might be a help in widening your horizons and perception in viewing classical music, other than that, you’d receive the training from the real maestros of classical music themselves. Yes, it’s a leverage when you come back to your country but just as many people are saying, Europe is the central of the classical music. So why go back?

    I think you effectively answered that question yourself. Smart people have this tendency to clump together and in doing so, you form a community of people who are passionate about a given subject area, allowing them more opportunities to expand their horizons and further the spread of ideas. So in order to measure up with the best of the best, the better ways of going about it is to find out where they clump and go there to see whether you’re up to snuff. And in this instance, Europe just happens to be where it’s at.

    I also think that the concern that they’ll stay in Europe is an unwarranted one since some people do go back and by going back, they can take that knowledge with them, allowing them to inspire others towards greatness. I’d say that even if only 5% come back from a study stint in Europe, that’s still enough to propel the next generation onwards.

  3. foomafooNo Gravatar says: August 24, 20096:18 pm

    Can’t fix my threaded comments so for a while —

    @manga,
    Hmm, I think there are many ways to achieve your dreams, It’s just it was pushed at the back of our minds that the one to do regarding music, specifically with classical, is to go to Europe…

    Yeah, music is diverse and yet at the age today, it’s as if you’ve heard bits and bits of it already from an existing music. ha, I just remember that quotation “there is very little creativity – in anything.” coutesy of Gonzo Mehum of the thoughtscream.

    @zzeroparticle,
    But, you could always compete internationally on your own way without having to stay and clumping on any country in particular. And even if you say so, that those people that return could propel the country’s situation, don’t you think, other countries would have developed as well already a community of classical musicians in that particular country if that’s true? But what’s happening is actually just them bringing back and pulling more musicians than how many is already there in Europe.

  4. KriselleNo Gravatar says: September 6, 200911:36 pm

    (With Philippines) I think music here isn’t really affected much by the government and is mostly controlled by private groups anyway (as you said, government support can only be seen after a group wins a contest). The thing is, the government probably can’t focus on them yet. For one, Philippine music isn’t really an international thing, something our country can market, which is why the government doesn’t invest on it a lot.

    In Japan, too. While there really are classical musicians who go international, popular music remains to be their best sellers — and that’s even a sort-of underground thing.

    There might have parents who liked their kids to learn some piano and violin, but oftentimes, they don’t let the child to pursue it as his/her profession.

    I’m not sure if I’m the only one who sees the problem like this, but in the music industry today, it’s not just talent. It’s marketability. Like the government, investing on something as risky isn’t very intelligent, really. I guess it depends? Also, a lot of people know that classical music doesn’t sell that well. Aside from only being limited to a certain group of people, it’s also pretty… old. I’m not saying that it isn’t beautiful, because I listen to pieces when I’m in the mood, but let’s face the truth.

    Oh well. XD

    PS. This is random but I love the headers! So pretty *A*

  5. foomafooNo Gravatar says: September 7, 200912:13 am

    “it’s not just talent. It’s marketability. ” – I guess I have to agree with this one. Having just the talent is somewhat similar in joining a pageant with a Q&A portion. One might be able to answer the Q&A portion but one won’t win just for that because one should still possess the “beauty” the jury is searching for. Oh yea, I’m studying economics, why didn’t I remember this fact.

    Either way, do you really think Philippines doesn’t have a market in the world when it comes to musicality? Well, I think we have our finest music enthusiasts here in the country but the government is just taking them for granted. Don’t you think it’s the government who must take the first step to offer the musicians the support and not the latter?

    And yeah, it’s old enough but just like other cultures, I think we must preserve them — I don’t know if I sound like an elite here because some people had already typecast(-ed) classical music with the elite people but I don’t really think that’s the issue. Well, this is the very reason why it is being typecast(-ed) to elite because normal people aren’t given the chance to hear it like an ordinary music.

    *haha, thanks for the compliment for my headers 🙂

  6. KriselleNo Gravatar says: October 7, 200912:20 pm

    One might be able to answer the Q&A portion but one won’t win just for that because one should still possess the “beauty” the jury is searching for.

    Sad truth, yes. Physical beauty will always have an edge, sadly.

    Either way, do you really think Philippines doesn’t have a market in the world when it comes to musicality? Well, I think we have our finest music enthusiasts here in the country but the government is just taking them for granted. Don’t you think it’s the government who must take the first step to offer the musicians the support and not the latter?

    Well, to tell you honestly, I do believe we have the talent, but we don’t have enough exposure nor chances (though I can’t fully agree with ‘finest’…). As for who’s going to take the first step, I strongly believe that proof should be set first by the musicians. For one, the government has other priorities to consider other than looking for talented artists to support. The artists themselves should look for their own means (private support, talent agencies that could make them big) first and prove themselves to be worth the money (I’ll put it this way: money that could support one artist to join an international program, or support the production of CDs to be sold internationally, can help fund a public school. Or something like that. Which is why they should be SURE first that they’re spending money and time on someone they won’t regret it over). That’s what I think, at least. A more useful suggestion would probably be them focusing on stopping pirated local goods FIRST from circulating before other things (and before foreign ones). Pirated CDs, for one, kill the earnings of the artists. Another thing would be the growing popularity of international artists over local artists (which is sad).

    I agree with you. If only that kind of music was promoted more to everyone, then it’ll probably gain a larger fanbase and appreciation… (which would help local artists, too)

    *No problem! And sorry for the super-late reply orzz

Submit comment

CommentLuv badge

Anti-Spam Quiz: